Pain compass

Toot­ha­che can have various cau­ses. Here we will inform you about typi­cal pain sym­ptoms and poten­ti­al remedies.

SYMPTOM: Brief sensivity to heat or cold

Poten­ti­al problem:

Brief sen­si­ti­vi­ty to heat and cold does not necessa­ri­ly indi­ca­te a serious pro­blem. The sen­si­ti­vi­ty could be due to a loose fil­ling or the gums rece­ding slight­ly, expo­sing a small amount of the root surface.

What can you do?

Try a tooth­pas­te for sen­si­ti­ve teeth. Only brush your teeth in an up-and-down moti­on, ide­al­ly only from the gums to the teeth (from red to white). Vigo­rous side­ways move­ments cause wear to the root sur­face. If all of this is unsuc­cess­ful, see your dentist.

SYMPTOM: Sensivity to hot or cold after dental work

Potential problem:

Den­tal tre­at­ment can tem­pora­ri­ly irri­ta­te the nerve insi­de the tooth. This can cause tem­pora­ry tooth sensitivity.

What can you do?

Plea­se wait up to 6 weeks. If the sen­si­ti­vi­ty per­sists or gets worse, plea­se con­ta­ct your dentist.

SYMPTOM: Sharp pain when chewing

Poten­ti­al problem:

There can be a varie­ty of rea­sons for this type of pain, which lead to tooth sen­si­ti­vi­ty; for examp­le, there could be a cavi­ty, a loose fil­ling or a crack in the tooth. This can then lead to dama­ge to the pulp (nerve).

What can you do?

In order to find out the exact cause, plea­se visit your den­tist. A crack in the tooth can lead to dama­ge to the tooth nerve, and can be trea­ted by an endodon­to­lo­gist (spe­cia­list in root canal treatment).

SYMPTOM: Persistent pain after eating hot or cold food

Potential problem:

The pulp (nerve) of your tooth is likely to be dama­ged by a deep cavi­ty or by phy­si­cal trau­ma (impact, fall etc.).

What can you do?

Visit your den­tist or endodon­to­lo­gist (spe­cia­list in root canal tre­at­ment). A root canal tre­at­ment will pro­bab­ly be necessa­ry to pre­ser­ve the tooth.

SYMPTOM: Constant, severe pain with pressure swelling of the gum and sensitivity to touch

Poten­ti­al problem:

One of your teeth pro­bab­ly has an abscess, which leads to infec­tion of the under­ly­ing bone.

What can you do?

Visit your den­tist or endodon­to­lo­gist (spe­cia­list in root canal tre­at­ment). It could help to pre­ser­ve the tooth. Take pain kil­lers until you see your clinician.

SYMPTOM: Dull pain and pressure in the upper jaw area

Potential problem:

The sym­ptoms of sinu­si­tis (sinus inflamma­ti­on) could feel like this. It is also pos­si­ble that the con­se­quen­ces of heavy teeth grin­ding (bru­xism) can mani­fest them­sel­ves like this.

What can you do?

In the case of suspec­ted sinu­si­tis, for the time being you can mana­ge with pain kil­lers and medi­ca­ti­on for sinu­si­tis, and visit your ENT or fami­ly phy­si­ci­an. If your pro­blem is bru­xism, plea­se con­ta­ct your dentist.

SYMPTOM: Cronic pain in the head, neck or ear

Poten­ti­al problem:

These types of pain are some­ti­mes cau­sed by teeth with a dama­ged pulp (nerve). It is not uncom­mon for these pains to mani­fest in other areas of the head and neck as well. Howe­ver, other gene­ral medi­cal or den­tal pro­blems could be responsible.

What can you do?

Visit your den­tist or endodon­to­lo­gist (spe­cia­list in root canal tre­at­ment) for a tho­rough exami­na­ti­on. If it is not a den­tal pro­blem, a fur­ther exami­na­ti­on by your gene­ral medi­cal doc­tor will be recommended.